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Wednesday, November 12, 2014

ScienceDaily: Top Science News

ScienceDaily: Top Science News

Why 'I'm so happy I could cry' makes sense

Posted: 11 Nov 2014 09:40 AM PST

The phrase 'tears of joy' never made much sense to one American psychologist. But after conducting a series of studies of such seemingly incongruous expressions, she now understands better why people cry when they are happy.

Tail discovered on long-known asteroid

Posted: 11 Nov 2014 08:13 AM PST

Astronomers have discovered a new active asteroid, called 62412, in the Solar System's main asteroid belt between Mars and Jupiter. It is the first comet-like object seen in the Hygiea family of asteroids.

Controlling genes with your thoughts

Posted: 11 Nov 2014 08:13 AM PST

Researchers have constructed the first gene network that can be controlled by our thoughts. Scientists have developed a novel gene regulation method that enables thought-specific brainwaves to control the conversion of genes into proteins (gene expression). The inspiration was a game that picks up brainwaves in order to guide a ball through an obstacle course.

Archaeologists discover remains of Ice Age infants in Alaska

Posted: 10 Nov 2014 01:11 PM PST

The remains of two Ice Age infants, buried more than 11,000 years ago at a site in Alaska, represent the youngest human remains ever found in northern North America, according to a new article.

Marijuana's long-term effects on the brain demonstrated

Posted: 10 Nov 2014 01:11 PM PST

The effects of chronic marijuana use on the brain may depend on age of first use and duration of use, according to new research. Researchers for the first time comprehensively describe existing abnormalities in brain function and structure of long-term marijuana users with multiple magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques.

Cat genome reveals clues to domestication​​

Posted: 10 Nov 2014 01:10 PM PST

Cats and humans have shared the same households for at least 9,000 years, but we still know very little about how our feline friends became domesticated. An analysis of the cat genome reveals some surprising clues.

Playing action video games can boost learning, study finds

Posted: 10 Nov 2014 01:10 PM PST

A new study shows for the first time that playing action video games improves not just the skills taught in the game, but learning capabilities more generally.

Best evidence yet for galactic merger in distant protocluster

Posted: 10 Nov 2014 01:10 PM PST

Nestled among a triplet of young galaxies more than 12.5 billion light-years away is a cosmic powerhouse: a galaxy that is producing stars nearly 1,000 times faster than our own Milky Way. This energetic starburst galaxy, known as AzTEC-3, together with its gang of calmer galaxies may represent the best evidence yet that large galaxies grow from the merger of smaller ones in the early Universe, a process known as hierarchical merging.

Baby photos of a scaled-up solar system

Posted: 10 Nov 2014 12:09 PM PST

Astronomers have discovered two dust belts surrounded by a large dust halo around young star HD 95086. The findings provide a look back at what our solar system may have resembled in its infancy.

Odor that smells like blood: Single component powerful trigger for large carnivores

Posted: 10 Nov 2014 12:09 PM PST

People find the smell of blood unpleasant, but for predatory animals it means food. When behavioral researchers wanted to find out which substances of blood trigger behavioral reactions, they got some unexpected results.

Some neurons can multitask, raising questions about importance of specialization

Posted: 10 Nov 2014 09:42 AM PST

The brain is constantly processing sensory information while supporting a dizzying array of behaviors. For decades, biologists have assumed that specialized classes of neurons process all this information at once. But a team of scientists has found a population of neurons in the rat brain that support multiple behaviors at once. These neurons cannot be individually classified by specialization, challenging assumptions about how information is encoded in the brain.

Stem cell transplants for Parkinson's disease edging closer

Posted: 06 Nov 2014 11:36 AM PST

A major breakthrough in the development of stem cell-derived brain cells has put researchers on a firm path towards the first ever stem cell transplantations in people with Parkinson's disease. A new study presents the next generation of transplantable dopamine neurons produced from stem cells. These cells carry the same properties as the dopamine neurons found in the human brain.

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